Something for Peachy


#1

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#2

Interesting that you’d make it with chifferi rigate. Probably quite nice that way. I couldn’t find any proper fideo so I used vermicelli and broke it into real short pieces.

I think next time I’ll use fettuccine, broken up. Could probably use egg noodles but that seems too Euro.


#3

Which is undesirable because…?

If you like egg noodles in this recipe, why not just use egg noodles?


#4

It’s kind of a Mexican recipe…sopa de fideo.


#5

I make it with macaroni or shell pasta too

Add cheddar cheese and lemon and yummy


#6

It looks like Campbell’s Tomato with some Mac tossed in, but I’m a peasant so what do I know?


#7

The secret is garlic and caldo de tomato


#8

This is closer to how I grew up eating it.


#9

Seems like there are as many recipes as there are moms and abuelitas. Even so, it looks like there are a couple of hard & fast ideas that most everyone observes.

I didn’t grow up with it by any means – I was raised on chili mac which is also pretty variable. But I was introduced to sopa de macaron in Costa Rica, my first introduction to the tomato & chicken combination.


#10

That is how it comes out when it’s made with less water


#11

Exactly Peachy. My mom made it thick sauced with loads of cheese


#12

I lean toward a thinner soup using fresh tomatoes (pureed) and chicken stock…I like to brown the pasta first cause it gets a nutty flavor. And I’m still trying different ways to handle the onion but there needs to be some. I don’t like garlic in this soup lest it become Italian. I don’t care for cheese on it but I’m open to a dollop of sour cream or some avocado slices as garnish.


#13

Avocado, some cilantro…do you spice with any cumin?


#14

I haven’t yet because I have the browned pasta. I think cumin would be nice with a thicker pasta like the elbows in the OP, cause they can’t be browned.

I usually don’t think of cumin except for when there are beans, but I do use it in guacamole, so…


#15

Latin food is very regional, including within a country.

Browning the pasta is crucial in my book, but if you use beef, which my family does…cumin is a great flavor for it. Just a little bit goes a long way. It blends well with garlic and definitely eliminates anything vaguely Italian. Which the cilantro also serves to do as well. Yummy stuff tho.

I would consider sprinkling queso fresco as a garnish, but not too much either.